Characteristics of MAC Address and TCP / IP Address

Characteristics of MAC Address and TCP / IP Address

1. MAC Address
MAC Address (Media Access Control) is a network address that is implemented in seven OSI layers that present a specific node in the network. Mac Address is a unique address that has a length of 48 bits, where 24 bits are made for whom the card is made while the rest presents the card number.
MAC Address Characteristics:
The MAC address consists of 6 bytes, or 48 bits (1 byte = 8 bits). This MAC address consists of two parts, namely the first 3 bytes, is the Organizationally Unique Identifier (OUI), or the unique code of the network card maker.

2. TCP / IP Address
TCP / IP (short for Transmission Control Protocol Internet Protocol) is a data communication standard used by the internet community in the process of exchanging data from one computer to another on an Internet network.
TCP / IP characteristics:
1. Connection-Oriented: Before data can be transmitted between two hosts, two processes running at the application layer must negotiate to establish a connection session first.
2. Full Duplex: The point is for each TCP host, the connection that occurs between two hosts simultaneously is the exit and entry path. By using layer technology that supports full-duplex, the data can be simultaneously received and sent. The TCP header contains a sequence number (TCP sequence number) of transmitted data and an acknowledgment from incoming data.

3. Realiable: Meaning Data sent to a TCP connection will be sorted by a packet number and will expect possitive acknowledgment packages (a transmission sent by the receiving station on the network to the sender that the data sent has been received with perfect without any errors) from the recipient. If there is no Acknowledgment package from the recipient, the TCP segment (protocol data unit in the TCP protocol) will be retransmitted. On the recipient side, duplicate segments will be ignored and segments that come not in the order will be placed behind to sort TCP segments. To ensure the integrity of each TCP segment, TCP implements TCP Chexum calculations.
4. Having flow control services: To prevent too much data from being sent at one time, which eventually “jams” IP internetwork networks (connecting two or more network segments using a router, so that a larger network is made), TCP implement flow control services that are owned by senders who continuously monitor and limit the amount of data sent at one time. To prevent the recipient from obtaining buffer data. TCP also implements flow control on the recipient’s side, which indicates the amount of buffer that is still available on the recipient’s side.